Sternenfotografie Dr. Hager

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M 3 – 5″ TMB Apo

M3, aka NGC 5272 is one of the most beautiful globular clusters in the northern hemisphere and it islocated in the constellation Canes Venatices. Superbly dark skies granted, it can be spotted with bare eye, as it shines at a 6m2. The apparent size is about 18.6 arc minutes. Discovered by Charles Messier on the 3rd of May 1746, M3 comprises more than 500.000 stars. the core region is enormously dense, making the object a serious test for both, visual and photographic observation. In a 5″ apochromatic refractor the center is split in terms of resolution, whereas a usual mirror-telescope would have to be at least 10″ in diameter to catch up…in visual observation.

M3 holds more than 200 variable stars (RR Lyrae type) which makes this cluster special. The very dense core measures only 1 arc minute and this is the reason why the cluster appears very bright, even though it is further away than the center of our galaxy. It takes the light 33.900 years to travell to earth.

Another very special feature on M3 was discoverd in 1953, when Mr. Alan Sandage operated the 200″ Mount Palomar scope, the largest telescope in that time, and found very hot and therefor blue stars, which appear to have a special development, other than the typical main-sequence stars. These so called “Blue stragglers” can be seen in the image.

Besides the mesmerizing beauty of that cluster, you most likely have already taken note of the sheer contless little background galaxies. These are very far in the cosmological background, having nothing to do with the cluster of course, which is a memeber of our own milky way., These galaxies you see are about 1 Bio LY away and unvisible for visual observation. Only by means of a most sensitive CCD these can be detected.


M 13 – 9″ TMB Apo

  • Date: 20.5.2007 – seeing 6/10; transp. 7/10
  • Scope: 9″ TMB Apo f/7 (0,8 TeleVue reducer)
  • CCD: SXV M25C 2,8 hours
  • Software: AstroArt4 image acqu. guiding, preprocessing
  • Processing: postprocess. PS CS2 and Pix InSight LE

M 67 – 5″ TMB Apo

  • Date: 24.Feb.2008 – seeing 6-7/10; transp. 6-7/10
  • Scope: 5 ” TMB Apo f/9
  • CCD: SXVF M25C 60 minutes, 4+8 min subs
  • Software: AstroArt4 image acqu. guiding, preprocessing
  • Processing: postprocess. PS CS2 and Pix InSight LE

M35 + NGC 2158 – 5″ TMB Apo

Date: 24.Feb.2008 – seeing 6-7/10; transp. 6-7/10
Scope: 5 ” TMB Apo f/9
CCD: SXVF M25C 120 minutes, 4+8 min subs
Software: AstroArt4 image acqu. guiding, preprocessing
Processing: postprocess. PS CS2 and Pix InSight LE

Discovered in 1745 by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux and seperately by John Bevis in 1750 M 35 is an open star-cluster, some 2700 Lightyears away from earth and it holds around 24 lightyears in diameter which appears in the size of the full moon on the night sky. The cluster is fabeled to count more than 500 proper members while the entire object is supposed to be 100 Mio years old.

Discovered by William Herschel in 1784 NGC 2158 was considered to be a globular cluster for a long periode until the 70ies. Its true nature came clear later and it is catalouged as an open cluster. This cluster measures only 5 arc minutes in diameter located some 10800 lightyears away from earth and being more than 1 Bio. years old.


NGC 2158 – 5″ TMB Apo

  • Date: 24.Feb.2008 – seeing 6-7/10; transp. 6-7/10
  • Scope: 5 ” TMB Apo f/9
  • CCD: SXVF M25C 120 minutes, 4+8 min subs
  • Software: AstroArt4 image acqu. guiding, preprocessing
  • Processing: postprocess. PS CS2 and Pix InSight LE

Discovered by William Herschel in 1784 this cluster was considered to be a globular cluster for a long periode until the 70ies. Its true nature came clear later and it is catalouged as an open cluster. This cluster measures only 5 arc minutes in diameter located some 10800 lightyears away from earth and being more than 1 Bio. years old.